Sumac Berry Jello

Sumac Berry Jello

Make a cold infusion of Sumac berry clusters for several hours.  Use this strained juice (put through a jelly bag or pillow case!) into a pot with the same berries, simmer for 10 minutes without boiling.  At the same time freeze a cup of this strained juice to make it cold.
Use 1 cup of it HOT to stir into a pectin box stir for 2 minutes with a whisk.
Add 1 cup of COLD Sumac berry juice, whisk together
Place in bowl to chill for a few hours till set.
Serve with a few Sumac Berries and Pine Needles for decoration.
Nutrition
Sumac Lemon Juice: potent tonic
Protein 11.9 g, Fat 16.8 g, Carbs 63.2 g, fiber 27.8 g, Ascorbic 143 mg, Ash 3.2 g,
Calcium 93 mg, Phosphorus 57 mg, Potassium 980 mg Potassium, Beta Carotene 1700 ug, Thiamin 300 us, Riboflavin 300 ug, Niacin 2500 ug.

Sumac berries are very popular in India and the Far East as a seasoning for fish and chicken and vegetables.  They are sold as Sumac Spice, oft time ground into a powder.  They cost $14.50 for two cups at the Spice Sage.

Za’atar-Tomato Appetizer with Sumac Spice
2 Tablespoons dried thyme  1 Tablespoon sumac   2 teaspoons sesame seeds, toasted
1/2 teaspoon table salt  1 pint cherry tomatoes    1 recipe Chickpea Flatbread
In a small container with a lid, shake together the thyme, sumac, sesame seeds and salt. This is a Middle Eastern spice blend called “zaatar.”  Cut each of the cherry tomatoes in half placing them into a medium bowl as you go. Sprinkle with one tablespoon of the zaatar; toss well. Taste and add more of the seasoning, in small increments, until you have what you consider a tasty concoction.

* Sumac early shoots are also quite edible.  Just peel the outer bark and eat raw or stir fried.